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Everyday home gear made smart

By | Android, Assistant, Belkin, belkin wemo, Bluetooth, Column, electronics manufacturing, Gadgets, Google, Home Automation, iRobot, kwikset, Nest Labs, Roomba, smart thermostat, smartphone, Speaker, wi-fi, Wirecutter

If you only have one smart home device, it’s likely something simple and fun like a voice-controlled speaker or color-changing LED light bulb. As you expand your smart home setup, you can begin to swap out gear that isn’t as flashy but you still use everyday.

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Extras for bringing the fun at summer festivals

By | Column, Gadgets, Wirecutter

Makula Dunbar Contributor Makula Dunbar is a writer with Wirecutter. More posts by this contributor The best Amazon Prime Day deals you can still grab Summer road trip tech essentials and extras Editor’s note: This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter’s independently chosen editorial picks, Wirecutter and TechCrunch […]

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Summer road trip tech essentials and extras

By | Anker SoundSync Drive, Arkon Center Extension Car Headrest Tablet Mount, Column, Gadgets, Garmin DriveSmart 51 LMT-S, iOttie Easy One Touch 4 Air Vent Mount, RAVPower RP-VC006, Wirecutter

Makula Dunbar Contributor Makula Dunbar is a writer with Wirecutter. More posts by this contributor Gear for making outdoor fitness more enjoyable The best home Wi-Fi and networking gear Editor’s note: This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter’s independently chosen editorial picks, Wirecutter and TechCrunch may earn affiliate […]

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Inside Atari’s rise and fall

By | Activision, animation, apollo, Atari, Atari Games, cashier, Column, computing, entertainment software association, formula one, Gadgets, gamestop, Gaming, JC Penney, kmart, laser, lasers, mattel, monaco, Namco, Nintendo, pac-man, phoenix, player, Prince, race car, racer, Rogue, rubber, super mario bros, TC, temple run, tomb raider, Toys R Us, Vice President

By the first few months of 1982, it had become more common to see electronics stores, toy stores, and discount variety stops selling 2600 games. This was before Electronics Boutique, Software Etc., and later, GameStop. Mostly you bought games at stores that sold other electronic products, like Sears or Consumer Distributors. Toys ’R’ Us was a big seller of 2600 games. To buy one, you had to get a piece of paper from the Atari aisle, bring it to the cashier, pay for it, and then wait at a pickup window behind the cash register lanes.

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