Category

Robotics

Google is closing its Schaft robotics unit after failing to find a buyer

By | Alphabet, andy rubin, boston dynamics, Gadgets, Google, humanoid robot, robot, Robotics, schaft, Shaft, Softbank, SoftBank Group, university of tokyo, X

Sad news for anyone into giant robots: Google parent Alphabet is closing down Schaft, its secretive unit that develops bipedal robots aimed at helping out in disaster efforts and generally looking badass. The news was first reported by Nikkei, but Alphabet confirmed to TechCrunch that the business will be shuttered. It said it is helping staff find […]

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The Da Vinci Drawmaton is a blast from the Renaissance

By | Artificial Intelligence, Da Vinci Surgical System, engineer, Gadgets, robot, Robotics, TC, The New York Times

Robert Sabuda makes mechanical books – pop up books with mechanical features that make them move and change while you read them – and he’s made it to the top of the New York Times best seller list multiple times. Now he’s taking on a new challenge: rebuilding and selling a version of Leonardo da […]

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TWIICE One Exoskeleton furthers the promise of robotic mobility aids

By | EPFL, exoskeleton, Gadgets, Hardware, Robotics, Wearables

Few things in the world of technology can really ever be said to be “done,” and certainly exoskeletons are not among their number. They exist, but they are all works in progress, expensive, heavy, and limited. So it’s great to see this team working continuously on their TWIICE robotic wearable, improving it immensely with the guidance of motivated users.

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The ultimate guide to gifting STEM toys: tons of ideas for little builders

By | adafruit industries, Anki, Artificial Intelligence, Asia, BBC Micro, Disney, Education, Europe, Gadgets, Gaming, Gift Guide 2018, Hardware, Kano, littlebits, makeblock, mattel, Robotics, TC

The holiday season is here again, touting all sorts of kids’ toys that pledge to pack ‘STEM smarts’ in the box, not just the usual battery-based fun. Educational playthings are nothing new, of course. But, in recent years, long time toymakers and a flurry of new market entrants have piggybacked on the popularity of smartphones […]

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Subterranean drone mapping startup Emesent raises $2.5M to autonomously delve the deep

By | Artificial Intelligence, Australia, Automation, csiro, drones, Funding, Fundings & Exits, Gadgets, Hardware, Robotics, Science, Startups, TC

Seemingly every industry is finding ways to use drones in some way or another, but deep underground it’s a different story. In the confines of a mine or pipeline, with no GPS and little or no light, off-the-shelf drones are helpless — but an Australian startup called Emesent is giving them the spatial awareness and intelligence to navigate and map those spaces autonomously.

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Reef-rejuvenating LarvalBot spreads coral babies by the millions

By | climate change, conservation, Gadgets, GreenTech, Robotics, Science

The continuing die-off of the world’s coral reefs is a depressing reminder of the reality of climate change, but it’s also something we can actively push back on. Conservationists have a new tool to do so with LarvalBot, an underwater robot platform that may greatly accelerate efforts to re-seed old corals with healthy new polyps.

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Inspired by spiders and wasps, these tiny drones pull 40x their own weight

By | drones, Gadgets, Robotics, Science, stanford, Stanford University, UAVs

If we want drones to do our dirty work for us, they’re going to need to get pretty good at hauling stuff around. But due to the pesky yet unavoidable restraints of physics, it’s hard for them to muster the forces necessary to do so while airborne — so these drones brace themselves against the ground to get the requisite torque.

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This 3D-printed prosthetic hand combines speed and strength with simplicity

By | 3d printing, Gadgets, Hardware, Prosthetics, Robotics, Science

Prosthetic limbs have come a long way from the heavy, solid hands and legs of yesteryear, but it’s still difficult to pack a range of motion into them without complex or bulky machinery. But new research out of Cornell uses a cleverly designed 3D-printed mechanism to achieve speed and strength with simple construction — and it costs a lot less, too.

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